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Expert .NET 1.1 Programming

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Expert .NET 1.1 Programming, 9781590592229 (1590592220), Apress, 2004
T his is a book about getting the best out of .NET. It's based on the philosophy that the best approach to writing good, high-performance, robust applications that take full advantage of the features of .NET is to understand what's going on deep under the hood. This means that some chapters explore the .NET internals and in particular Common Intermediate Language (CIL), and other chapters have a practical basis, covering how to use specific technologies such as threading, dynamic code generation, and Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) .

This book isn't a purely theoretical book for geeks, but it also isn't one of those purely problem-solving books that tells you how to write some code to do something without explaining how and why it works. Rather, I've sought to combine the twin aspects of practical technology: showing how to create specific applications while also diving under the hood of the Common Language Runtime (CLR) . I believe that the true advanced .NET developer needs both. So a lot of the book is devoted to showing how .NET works; I'll go way beyond the MSDN documentation in places-and generally beyond most other .NET books currently available. But I never go into some abstract feature just for the sake of it. I always focus on the fact that understanding this CLR implementation detail can in some way help you to write better code. And some chapters show you how to write better applications in specific areas such as Windows Forms, how to take advantage of .NET features such as security, and how to better optimize for performance.
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